"Cloud" is the current buzz word in business software. It is a new delivery model that brings both benefits and limitations. Beyond the hype, this blog is a basic guide to define the most suitable delivery model for your ERP system.

Modern Enterprise Resource Planning software or ERP are the jack of all trades of business IT. Starting with procurement and manufacturing functionality in the 70's, they now encompass a wide range of features from financials, operations, HR and analytics.

The primary value of an ERP is the integration and optimisation of the various business processes of an organisation. A good ERP will eliminate duplicate data entry and provide consistent information to all staff.

For the IT department, it reduces the complexity of interfacing multiple systems, each of them with their own release lifecycle.

With the promises of improved productivity and profitability, why do many ERP implementations fail to live up to user expectations? What can you do about the missing features and functionality that you need?

You just bought a new ERP system and I hope that my previous blog convinced you of the value of an internal change agent to drive your project. A frequent issue I encountered in my consulting and implementation days was the urge to bend, twist and customise the software to match exactly how the business works today. Isn't each business unique? Surely we can't have software that fits hundreds if not thousands of businesses?

After 30 years in the ERP industry, one starts to get a good grasp of what goes into a successful ERP implementation and the pitfalls to avoid. I’ve pulled together some tips that CEOs should consider before embarking on an ERP project. If you can avoid these top five common mistakes, you’d know that your project is off to a good start.

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